Ancestral Pueblo: Southern Colorado Plateau (Anasazi)Eastern (Mountain) AnasaziUpper San JuanUpper San Juan Gray WareArboles Neckbanded/ Clapboarded/Coiled

Type Name: Arboles Neckbanded/ Clapboarded/Coiled

Period: 800 A.D. - 1000 A.D.
Culture: Ancestral Pueblo: Southern Colorado Plateau (Anasazi)
Branch: Eastern (Mountain) Anasazi
Tradition: Upper San Juan
Ware: Upper San Juan Gray Ware


First posted by C. Dean Wilson 2012

Arboles Neckbanded was defined in Dittert and Others (1963). This type is similar to Arboles Gray in paste and polish, but exhibits coils that have not been obliterated on the exterior of the vessel neck (Reed and Goff 2007; Wilson and Blinman 1993). The coils are flattened into fillets, and the junctures are not elaborated. Only a few bands of coils are present on the shoulders of early vessels of the type. Paste differentiates this type from Rosa Neckbanded, and coil shapes distinguish this type from Arboles Clapboarded and Arboles Coiled. Polish may be present on the bodies of some Arboles Banded, but polish appears to be too rare to warrant the use of a Piedra Banded type. Because this type is defined by the nature of coil junctures, variation within portions of a neckbanded vessel can result in sherds of more than one type upon breakage of the vessel. Arboles Banded is consistently present in Piedra phase sites of the Navajo Reservoir area and persists in Arboles phase collections. This type occurs only sporadically in contexts dating before A.D. 800, increasing through the mid-ninth century, and decreasing as other neckbanded styles become popular in the late ninth and early 10th centuries. Arboles Clapboarded is identical to Arboles Gray and Arboles Banded in paste, but it has a distinctive surface manipulation. Multiple coil junctures at and below the rim on the exterior are not obliterated, and are emphasized by overlapping coils. The junctures may or may not be elaborated by wiping, incision, or tooling. Examples with rounded coils that do not overlap may be characterized as Arboles Coiled.

References:
Dittert, Alfred E., Beth L. Dickey and Frank W. Eddy
1963 Excavations at Sambrito Village, Navajo Reservoir District. Museum of New Mexico Papers in Anthropology, New Mexico of New Mexico Press, Santa Fe.

Reed, Lori and Joel Goff
2007 A Field Guide to Upper San Juan Anasazi and Navajo Pottery. Prepared for the NMAC Ceramic Workshop, Farmington District Office,Document on file, Bureau of Land Management, Farmington.

Wilson, C. Dean, and Eric Blinman
1993 Upper San Juan Ceramic Typology. Office of Archaeological Studies Archaeology Notes 80, Santa Fe.




Related Photos

Arboles Coiled jar with handle

Arboles Neckbanded jar sherds