Rio Grande Hispanic

The identification and classification of pottery from vessels produced by potters residing in Hispanic¬Ě villages in central and north-central New Mexico is a very difficult and often contentious issue. While previously established Pueblo pottery traditions appear to have easily supplied almost all of the pottery needs of the first wave of Spanish colonists into New Mexico, intermarriage and acculturation during the late eighteenth through the nineteenth century may have contributed to pottery-making becoming a part of the economy at many Hispanic villages.




Carnue Gray Utility sherds

Carnue Gray Utility

Carnue Gray Utility bowl sherds

Carnue Gray Utility

Carnue Gray Utility jar sherds

Carnue Gray Utility

Carnue Gray jar sherd

Carnue Gray Utility

Carnue Gray jar sherd (exterior surface)

Carnue Gray Utility

Carnue Gray jar sherd (interior surface)

Carnue Gray Utility

Carnue Gray jar sherd

Carnue Gray Utility

Casitas Red-on-brown

Casitas Red-on-brown

Casitas Red-on-brown bowl sherd

Casitas Red-on-brown

Casitas Red-on-brown bowl sherd

Casitas Red-on-brown

Casitas Red-on-brown bowl sherd

Casitas Red-on-brown

Valencia White soup plate (exterior surface)

Valencia (Salinas) White

Valencia White bowl sherds

Valencia (Salinas) White